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Monday, February 8, 2016

Asheville North Carolina



Urban Farm and Mountain Trails Gourmet Cuisine Public Art Music Heritage and Bohemian Culture
An Urban Trail Asheville has a fascinating past; experience a walking itinerary that commemorates the city’s most significant cultural, educational, social and architecture stories. The “museum without walls” begins and ends at Pack Square Park. The first stops span The Gilded Age, 1880 to 1930, the pre-depression boom time when the arrival of the railroad brought many travelers; the 1827 Buncombe Turnpike was a busy route for stagecoaches and covered wagons filled with animals going to market.
A City with an Outdoor History Museum
Walk down Patton Avenue and the O. Henry plaque, complete with the comb and watch from his famous short story “The Gift of the Magi.” Then read about Elizabeth Blackwell MD, who founded the first four-year medical college for women in the 1850s. Along this section, check out the beautiful art-deco Kress and Woolworth Buildings, former department stores now filled with works of many local artists.


Downtown Asheville has over 150 unique shops, galleries, and cafes, many offering outdoor seating, with lots of opportunity to browse or buy. Interesting architecture, street performers, festivals and independent restaurants.
Food Scene Asheville is a community of culinary talents who believe that every meal is a celebration. 17 local tailgate markets sell farm-fresh produce and artisan goods. Artists, bakers, cheese makers and more converge each week to provide the best in locally made products from small farms that use sustainable practices and grow a wide variety of crops.
The Western North Carolina Cheese Trail covers the hills and dales of the Appalachians and foothills; a great way to soak up some rural mountain beauty and sample some of the best goat and cow milk handmade cheese in the South.
Craft Beers with more breweries per capita than anywhere else in America, Asheville was first named Beer City USA in 2009 and has swept the competition almost every year since.


Planning Your Trip assumes uniquely local dimensions wherever you go; the activities that you, the visitor – local, or global –  select and irrespective of the length of your stay, are unique of the community you are visiting and rooted into the local economy, history and traditions. TEMA develops personalized travel itineraries based on client interests by leveraging an in-depth knowledge of your destination, superior client service in the planning stages and throughout the trip or event as well as logistics expertise to reduce your travel costs and transfer times. tema@arezza.net | skype arezza1
Music Heritage Asheville has a long history with music, beginning with traditional songs and tunes brought to the area by Scotch-Irish settlers. Over the years, the legends of what was once called mountain music, people like Jimmie Rodgers and Bill Monroe, Doc Watson and the Steep Canyon Rangers contributed their own work to Asheville's cultural scene. Traditional music is still alive and well in Western North Carolina.
The Appalachian Music Traditions of old time Jam Sessions Soulful Ballads and Bluegrass Jamborees
Art is everywhere in Asheville. Peek around an alleyway to find murals depicting the city’s underground history. The River Arts District of Asheville consists of a vast array of artists and working studios set in an urban scene of old factories and historical buildings. Many studios are open every day, all year round; explore artist studios and watch while they work, or meet the artists and discuss the creative process.
The open studios are scattered throughout 19 historic buildings along the French Broad River. There are artist's demonstrations and hands-on activities.


The Blue Ridge Parkway entertains you during a 469-mile cinematic experience, a masterpiece of the National Park collection, traveling from Shenandoah National Park to Great Smoky Mountains National Park ebbing and flowing with the landscape through protected peaks, wetlands, and trailheads around every corner.


Discovering the Smokies by Trail or Train walking in the 520,000 acre Great Smoky Mountains National Park is to follow in the footsteps of the Cherokee Indians who lived on this land many thousand of years; stand atop Clingman’s Dome, fish for trout in the same clear streams and spot the same spring wildflowers as did the ancient Cherokee people.
Board a Vintage Train in Bryson City and Visit some the Park’s most Scenic Areas

Professional Enrichment Programs focus suburban sprawl, declining water quality, diminishing water supplies, vanishing agricultural land, loss of historic character, wildlife habitat degradation, and threatened biological resources. Learn to:
Protect and conserve land and water, natural, cultural and scenic resources;
Improve site planning and design to support resource conservation;
Enhance awareness and knowledge of conservation approaches.
If you are in local government, are a developer, landowner or in business and are interested in expanding your skills in these areas, please contact us for a no obligation travel and/or training plan.

Cataloochee Valley for Hiking Heritage & Wildlife Appalachian Heritage this gorgeous green valley, 55 miles from Asheville, was once an early settlement of farmers. A visit here is like walking back into the early nineteenth century. Walk into the old school house and see the initials of the students carved into the desks. Picture folks dressed in their Sunday best as they enter Palmer Church in the 1890’s.







Biltmore Estate Explore the wonders of America’s largest home, magnificent gardens and award-winning winery. 8,000 acres with outdoor activities that include fly-fishing, biking and rafting. Seasonal events include Christmas at Biltmore, Festival of Flowers and Biltmore Summer Evening Concerts. Guided specialty tours including Biltmore House Architect’s Tour and Biltmore House Butler’s Tour







Connect with Tema
for a Travel Experience in Asheville and North Carolina
Local Knowledge – Global Reach
tema@arezza.net |skype arezza1