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Monday, August 7, 2017

A New Business in Your Community

a network of neighborhoods main streets and historic districts
Tema is implementing projects in selected small towns, main streets and historic districts around the
United States that focus on tourism, logistics, energy efficiency and water conservation in museums, breweries, vineyards/wineries, hotels and other accommodation venues visited by our travel clients.
Our Travel Clients are interested in heritage and preservation tourism, architecture, the environment, conservation and other professional enrichment itineraries, cultural, food, wine and brew events.
Traveling Clients
Inbound Travel Groups are interested in historic preservation, architecture, gastronomy, wine and brew tastings events, the outdoors, local farm practices as well as energy efficiency, transit land and water conservation practices.
Tema makes payments to local service providers at cost with no mark-ups for booking accommodations, sightseeing and other event entry fees as well as lunches and dinners. Alternatively, the client pays the service provider directly based on instructions from Tema.
Our Clients typically visit and participate in professional enrichment programs at local events, seminars and other learning experiences. Travel programs are designed to cover multiple regions of the United States.
Local Management
For Logistics, travel related and environmental management services; interested individuals, businesses, nonprofits and local governments that can materially contribute to the successful implementation of the projects, are welcome to participate.
Participating Local Businesses are provided with a no cost, no obligation proposal to implement energy savings and water conservation measures that will also be showcased to visitors. Energy Services Agreements are entered in with the local energy services company - ESCo.
Ways & Means
The Program is funded in part with proceeds from the travel projects. Transactions profits are invested in local logistics, energy efficiency and water conservation related projects.
Benefits to Your Business and Community
A New Local Business is formed to manage travel, energy, water and logistics activities. Funds are managed by a local nonprofit during the transition period estimated at 12-18 months when the new enterprise becomes fully operational. The New Local Enterprise is an:
attractor for visitors interested in Transport, Energy, Water and other Environment Issues.
Engages in Many Small Projects leading to Opportunities for employment and skills training.
Economies of Scale benefits include centralized marketing and management that favor all local partner jurisdictions, simultaneously lowering unit costs for product and service purchases.
Tell Us About Your Community
Tourism and Environment Management

tema@arezza.net | Skype arezza1

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Travel Related Services Family Vacations Groups Travel Business Trips

Local Transportation Private Car, Van, Bus Service and local taxi transfers inclusive of insurance, taxes, tolls, fuel and driver services, city to city, airport transfers and sightseeing events. Tips are not included.
Accommodations Inclusive of breakfast, applicable taxes and local city tax. Tips are not included.
Sightseeing Guide Services include applicable taxes. Tips are not included.  
Lunches and Dinners are complete in all respects in restaurants, at your accommodations and include applicable taxes. Tips are not included.
A Note on Sightseeing Excursions In our experience with groups and families, there may be multiple interests – cultural, gastronomic, shopping and more. We are prepared to make-adjustments if, for example, on a specific day some members of your family want to do a cultural tour while others may want to go to the beach or just relax by the pool at your accommodations. 
Changes can be Made to Your Travel Plan even while Your Trip is in Progress
Terms & Conditions
Cancellation Policy you may cancel your accommodations and ground services reservations without penalty at any time prior to trip start. In the event of cancellation, the planning fee is reimbursed; however, all information, contacts, accommodations and other service providers cannot be utilized directly or indirectly by you for purposes of your trip.
Communications the client is asked to refrain from imparting instructions to and making changes to any aspect of the travel program with the service providers. All communications before and during the trip will only take place with members of our team that will be brought to your attention. The client will appoint one person in the group to communicate with our team regarding all aspects of the travel program.
Payments
Tema makes payments to providers at cost, with no mark-ups, for booking accommodations, sightseeing and other event entry fees, airline and intercity train service as well as lunches and dinners. Alternatively, the client can make the payments with Tema’s instructions.
A Trip Planning Fee is due and payable at the time the client agrees to utilize Tema’s services to organize and plan the client’s business travel and/or vacation.
To Get Started Please Advise Number of Persons Traveling, Trip Dates and Locations
A Management Fee is due and payable three days prior to client’s trip start.
Local Transport Fees defined as private car, van, bus service and local taxi transfers are due and payable to Tema three days prior to client’s trip start.
Guide Service Fees are due and payable to Tema three days prior to client’s trip start.
The above referenced fees are a function of number of persons traveling and trip length. The client will be appraised of the planning fee on the same day of contact with Tema. All other fees will be spelled out in the overall travel plan which includes accommodations and other service providers and costs.  
We look forward to being of service.
Your Connection to Travel Related Services
Tourism and Environment Management

tema@arezza.net | skype arezza1

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

The Cost of Water

Billing Meters Sub Meters Metrics Outdoors Landscaping O&M Irrigation
The Cost of Water is deceptively low as building owners and tenants pay for water twice - water supplied + water discharged to the sewer. Additional considerations include the cost of energy required to pump and heat water and rate increases over time from energy and water utilities. Cost control solutions and incentives range from fulfilling water requirements for building certifications, conducting water audits, inclusive of leak detection, to incorporating water efficiency into standard operating procedures and procurement policies.
Billing Issues verify your property’s rate class and meter size, read water meters regularly to verify usage - units and scale of readings should match bills and internal log books.
Water Meters Require Limited Maintenance and Annual Calibration
Bills can cover multiple meters with specific water usage for each; match all meters listed with their location and equipment covered. Record usage individually and ask utilities for credit on sewer charges for water lost to evaporation instead of being discharged to sewer, irrigation and cooling towers.
Meter and Submeter all sources of water to help identify areas for targeted reductions: city potable, reclaimed water and well water. Most facilities have one or two master meters supplying the whole building; others have one meter for an entire campus with multiple buildings. Submeters:
do not have to be on separate utility accounts;
can help identify leaks and equipment inefficiencies or malfunctions.
Water Metrics the sum of all sources: Potable Water from public water systems and classified for human consumption. Reclaimed Water wastewater treatment plant effluent purchased from a public water system. Well Water obtained from wells, bore wells, and other groundwater sources. Natural Freshwater sources that are not municipally supplied, including surface water sources such as lakes or streams. Other Sources rainwater or storm water harvested onsite, sump pump water harvesting, gray water, air-cooling condensate, reject water from water purification systems, water reclaimed onsite, or water from other reuse strategies.
Outdoor Water Usage the amount of water used outdoors is dictated by landscape size and design, the need for supplemental irrigation, management of pools and other facilities. Outdoor water use is a primary driver of peak use.
Landscaping a well-designed, healthy, water-efficient landscape includes healthy soils to promote water infiltration and root growth, appropriate grading with gentle slopes, mulching of landscaped beds to keep soils cool and moist, drought-tolerant, native, or climate/regionally appropriate plant species, minimal turf area.
O&M maintain existing plantings and protect your investment in plants, remove weeds so water is available for desired plants, allow turf grass to grow longer to achieve deeper root growth, make shade and apply less water to shaded areas, minimize water used for other purposes, shut off water features whenever possible, recirculate in water features, sweep, don’t water hard surfaces.
Irrigation install rain shutoff devices or sensors, soil moisture-based control technologies and sprinklers. Maintenance check the system for broken or clogged sprinkler heads, move or adjust sprinkler components to avoid watering pavement, install and monitor water submeters for irrigation systems, monitor monthly use trends, audit irrigation system every three years.
Your Connection to Water Cost Controls
Innovative Solutions to Achieve Water Conservation

tema@arezza.net  | skype arezza1

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Water Resources Best Management Practices

conservation submeters water projects storm water waterways watershed infrastructure
Water and Energy Projects are catalysts in generating new employment opportunities and entrepreneurial efforts in communities that are in the forefront of managing watershed and water resources issues in urban and rural settings.
Managing Water Resources
Communities are confronting new and complex challenges to achieve safe and affordable water supplies, collect and treat waste water and storm water, flood protection, rivers and streams for fishing and swimming. There are also challenges with aging infrastructure and the impact of climate change on human health and ecosystems.
Challenges that Require New Infrastructure Investments and Approaches to Urban Water Resources
Storm Water if rain is not properly managed and flows over impervious surfaces into the nearest storm drain, it can have a detrimental effect on rivers and streams. In an urban environment, storm water is also closely related to safety, flooding, waterway health and drinking water.
Waterways urbanization is responsible for many of the sources that contribute to waterway degradation. Increases in impervious surface area and runoff have negative effects on stream flow. Once the natural physical condition of a waterway is compromised by pollution or excessive runoff, it sets off a chain of degradation: erosion, water temperature changes and habitat loss.
Watershed groups, municipalities, agencies, and conservation groups working together to develop watershed and restoration plans, implement projects and return streams to healthy thriving systems by implementing watershed assessments and planning programs, quality control plans, floodplain protection, land use management and storm water best management practices and more.
Infrastructure Requires Continuous Inspection and Maintenance
Water Conservation the true cost of water in a property should be measured as the water rate + the sewer rate multiplied by the water consumption volume + plus fees and other associated costs. In addition, while the water usage profile varies by building type and use, mechanical systems account for 30 percent of water use in a typical building, with cooling towers nearly 50 percent and outdoor usage another 20-30 percent.
Water Heating Accounts for Eight Percent of Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings
Submeters help identify inefficiencies and malfunctions as leaks account for six percent of water usage and older fixtures consume up to five times more water prompting installation of leak detection systems.
Your Connection to Water and the Environment
Innovative Solutions to Achieve Water Quality

tema@arezza.net  | skype arezza1

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Philadelphia and the Delaware River Valley



River Walk and Bike Trails Food Wine Ale and Neighborhood Preservation
The Delaware River Valley is the metropolitan area centered on the city of Philadelphia, the region's major commercial, cultural, and industrial center. Among the many sights to take in when visiting the first capital of the United States: The Liberty Bell Center which houses the American Revolution’s defining symbol, the site of the meetings of Congress and the Constitutional Convention at the City Tavern in the Old City as well as Carpenters Hall. In Declaration House, visitors can see where Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence and Independence Hall where it was signed.

Greater Philadelphia Transportation

The region’s excellent road and rail network make it the perfect location for a vacation or business trip to the Middle Atlantic States. Philadelphia International is a major airline hub with daily connections to North American destinations and from major European cities.


The River and the Environment
The Delaware River is comprised of 36 tributaries and flows 330 miles from New York to Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware to the Atlantic Ocean. It extends from the Catskill and Pocono mountain springs and streams flowing down to the Delaware Water Gap where steep slopes give way to gently rolling hills and sweeping valleys. Then, it stretches 134 miles from the Trenton falls to the mouth of the Delaware Bay read 
 Food Wine Ale Walk and Bike Trails
The Philadelphia Culinary Tradition was shaped by several ethnic groups. Cheesesteaks and soft pretzels are well known icons of this city and the 1970s saw a restaurant renaissance that is continuing into the 21st century. Food traditions include Pepper Pot, a soup of tripe, meat and vegetables from the Revolutionary War era and Snapper Soup a thick brown turtle soup served with sherry. Cheesesteaks, hoagies and roast pork sandwiches have helped Philadelphia become America’s sandwich city read
Neighborhood and Community Preservation
Lehigh Valley Historic Towns and Boroughs Allentown Bethlehem Easton Nazareth Hazleton Jim Thorpe Wilkes-Barre. A thriving town with roots in the iron industry, by 1829 Allentown expanded from a small Pennsylvania Dutch village of farmers and tradesmen to a center of commerce read
The Lehigh Valley Gave Birth to America’s Industrial Revolution
Bucks County is one of the three original counties created by William Penn in 1682. Bristol is the oldest town in Bucks County and the third oldest in Pennsylvania. It is the southern terminus of the D&L Trail characterized by coal yards, shipyards, warehouses and textile mills read
Chestnut Hill a beautiful award-winning neighborhood tucked into the northwest corner of Philadelphia. Renowned for its gardens, art and architecture, parks, shopping and dining, it is a lovely place to live or visit with many diverse, culturally enriching experiences. read
historic districts preservation and pirates
Delaware County and River Towns Marcus Hook’s historical significance comes from its identity as a maritime town. Originally a Lenape settlement, it became a New Sweden trading post in the 1640s with shipbuilding and fishing as early industries. The Hook was also a haven for pirates in the early 18th century and its market provided a place to sell plundered goods and re-supply for their next voyage read

 
Delco Outdoor Recreation and Family Activities
Linvilla Orchards - education and recreation Longwood Gardens - woodlands and gardens
John Heinz Wildlife Refuge Ridley Creek State Park - hiking and equestrian trails
Colonial Pennsylvania Plantation - a living museum & revolution era farm
Sesame Place - a theme park with rides and attractions
Wayne Lansdowne Historic Districts the Downtown Wayne district includes approximately 100 properties roughly bounded by Louella Ct., West Ave., and S. Wayne Ave. Amongst the buildings is the Anthony Wayne Theatre designed in Italian Renaissance style and built around 1864 read
Chester County was established by William Penn in 1682, one of the first three counties in Pennsylvania; West Chester is the county seat. Other historic towns include Kennett Square, Oxford and Phoenixville. Each has its own unique agricultural, revolutionary and industrial histories read
New Castle and Wilmington Delaware founded by the Swedes and Finns in 1638, later acquired by the Dutch in 1655 and the British in 1739, Wilmington was the last stop to freedom on the Underground Railroad. Today it offers a rich performing arts scene, great museums. local wineries and breweries read

Your Connection to Philadelphia and the Delaware River Valley
Travel Destinations Management Services
tema@arezza.net  | skype arezza1

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Typical Foods of Cilento



olive oil lentils chickpeas truffles artichokes figs bread wine and mozzarella
Olive Oil the Phoenicians planted the first olive trees around the XVI century BC, first on the island of Cyprus then in Asia Minor. Its greatest success was achieved in Greece where the myth was that the goddess Athena, in competition with the other gods, was declared the winner of a contest by Zeus by creating the olive tree. Historians have determined that the first olive tree “Plato's Olive Tree” was planted near Athens some 2500 years ago.
Olive Oil is Cultivated Everywhere in Italy with 23 DOP and 1 IGP Denominations
In Cilento, it is cultivated on the hills and by the sea, blending harmoniously with other species in the territory. As one of the pillars of the Mediterranean Diet, extra-virgin olive oil is present in virtually all the dishes of this area. Among its benefits is the lack of physical and chemical manipulations as it is simply extracted by pressing the olives. It is the only oil produced by a fruit as opposed to a seed.
Legumes were introduced only from the 10th Century, thereby making a gradual contribution to the welfare of the population, increasing resistance to disease and thereby aiding in the repopulation of Europe. Later, with the discovery of the Americas and the importation of agricultural products, beans emerged as a basic staple without which the population could not have doubled in size in just a few centuries.
In Italy, beans, peas, lentils, chickpeas and fava beans are the most common staples. Some are canned and are therefore available off season and in areas where they are not cultivated. Both fresh and dry, they are a key component of Italian cuisine and especially the cucina povera.
Lentils were among the first foods to be cultivated and consumed by man; traces have been found in Turkey in ruins dating back to 5500 BC as well as in Egyptian tombs from 2500 BC.
Cickpeas originally from the Orient, the name derives from the Latin word aries which refers to the shape of the seed. A major staple in the Middle East and in India, they are cooked with pasta, as soup and as a side dish.
the best way to travel is in the company of people who live and work in the places you visit. So, if you are planning a vacation or business trip contact us for a no obligation travel itinerary.
We don’t just sell you a travel plan; we experience it with you!
The Black Truffle has found a perfect habitat in the beech woods in harmony with oak trees, birch, hazel trees and black pine. It can be found in different areas of central and southern Italy, including the Picentini mountains that cut across Avellino and Salerno provinces. It has had its place for nearly two thousand years in the more culturally sophisticated gastronomy, appreciated for its unique aroma. It has been found in sizes approaching that of a grapefruit and acts as an environmental guard as it refuses to grow in polluted terrain.
Artichokes the Paestum plain is famous for its abundant and quality production of fruits and vegetables. Aside from tomatoes, lettuce, fennel and zucchini, artichokes are very important. Originally a plant of the Eastern Mediterranean and North Africa, artichokes have become economically important in the Cilento region from the 1920s following major land reclamation.
The White Fig its Cilentano origins precede the 6th Century BC but its roots are from Southern Arabia. This fruit started as the poor man's bread but today it is considered a delicacy. Dry figs are also stuffed with chocolate, fennel seeds, almonds, chestnuts and other ingredients available in Cilento.
The History of Bread begins with that of man with barley and millet the preferred ingredients as they were ideal from a nutritional standpoint; they were eventually replaced by cereal. The invention of bread can be attributed to the Egyptians nearly 3000 years ago. They also developed the first ovens.
The Greeks Developed 72 varieties of Bread whereas the Romans Improved on Windmills
Wine is by its very nature the opposite of an industrial product that never varies; it is different from area to area and is subject to climactic conditions. It also evolves, matures and declines over time.
There is no Such Thing as Biological Wine Only Biological Grapes
Mozzarella the domestic water buffalo originated from India and Persia. It arrived in Italy in the year 596 during the reign of the Longobard king Aginulfo. It thrives in warm, swampy areas rich in water such as the Nile Delta. In Europe, it has found fertile ground in Puglia, Campania and the low lands along the Danube river. In Cilento, mozzarella was received with great pleasure by the nobility while on the Grand Tour to Pompeii and Paestum. They were served the provatura of the buffalo cheese, a test to verify the salt content. The word mozzarella comes from mozzata or cutting.
Mozzarella di Bufala is Recognized with a DOC Label in Italy and a DOP Label in Europe
Mozzarella is produced exclusively with buffalo milk, mostly in Campania and Southern Lazio, in four distinct phases: acidification of the milk; maturation; preparation and conservation.
Your Connection to Cilento and South Italy
Travel Destinations Management Services
tema@arezza.net  | skype arezza1
 Information and Reservation
Travel Duration 3 nights and 4 days. Group Size Minimum 4, Maximum 50 persons.
Cost/Person/Day Euro 245 for adults age 19 to 64 Euro 195 for seniors 65+ and children under 18.
Information for Booking First and Last Name, Passport Number, Expiration date and Issuing country, Date of birth, Email address.
Included Travel between cities and states that are part of the itinerary, lunches and dinners, accommodations in double occupancy with breakfast for three nights, applicable local and state taxes, one-half day sightseeing events, local transport services.
Excluded Evening entertainment and transport to tour location start and from tour ending location.
Day/time Day to day programs and specific events at each location, as well as the sequence of the tour stops, will be finalized with the participation of the clients after details on family/group composition have been determined to take-into-account client priorities and preferences.
Reductions Children under the age of 18 and seniors over the age of 65 traveling with parents and/or guardians, staying in the same hotel room receive a 20 percent discount.