Translate

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Hudson Delaware and Susquehanna River Trails A USA Travel Experience



Brandywine Lehigh Lancaster Hershey Harrisburg Dutchess and Rockland
Pennsylvania
Hershey Harrisburg and the Susquehanna River Valley
The Susquehanna River is 464 miles (747 km) long and is the longest river on the US East Coast. With its watershed, it is the 16th-largest river in the United States, and the longest river in the continental United States without commercial boat traffic today. In the Canal Era, navigation improvements were made to enhance the river for barge shipping of bulk goods by water on the Pennsylvania Canal.



Harrisburg, the Capital of Pennsylvania, was inhabited by Native Americans as early as 3000 BC. Known as Peixtin, the area was an important trading post for Native American traders, as trails leading from the Delaware to the Ohio Rivers, and from the Potomac to the Upper Susquehanna intersected there.




 

Hershey is a year-round, world class travel destination with an amusement park, exclusive resorts and family attractions. In 1906, Milton Hershey opened Hershey Park as a place where his chocolate factory’s workers and their families could relax and be entertained. Surrounded by some of America’s most productive dairy farms, the world’s first modern chocolate factory and model town is a real community. Read More




Preserving America’s Antique Automobiles Vehicles of all types 25 years or older are welcome in the AACA.  In 1993, the AACA started a nonprofit organization to further preserve these antique automobiles and educate the public.
AACA One of Only Two US Automotive Museums Affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution
American History unfolds as decade after decade of car models, memorabilia, and collectibles come to life.  Over eight decades of cars are displayed in themed settings such as the Golden Gate Bridge, an Art Deco hotel, a gas service station, a covered bridge and Battery Park in New York.  Read More



Downtown Lancaster an Architectural and Heritage Itinerary
A walk in downtown Lancaster is a unique experience with historic buildings of different architectural styles and periods and three centuries of Lancaster's civic, commercial, religious, social and architectural history. A leisurely walk can be accomplished in less than an hour. Read More







The Coal Iron Steel and Canals of the Delaware and Lehigh Valleys
The Delaware & Lehigh five county region of Northeastern Pennsylvania developed in the late 18th Century as a result of the anthracite mines, the iron and steel industries, and the canals that were built to reach Philadelphia and other markets. Read More
Walking Biking and Cruising the Delaware and Lehigh Valley Trail
165 miles of nature history preservation recreation and education
From its origins as a means to transport anthracite coal from the mines of Luzerne and Carbon County to the markets in the Lehigh Valley and Philadelphia, the D&L Trail is now a multi-use trail originating from the mountains of northeast Pennsylvania through the rivers and communities of the Lehigh Valley and Bucks County. Read More
Philadelphia the Brandywine Valley & Wilmington Delaware
Cultural Itineraries Wine Ale and Water Trails and Sustainability
In Philadelphia the waterfront is now a walking and biking destination which covers 6 miles. Trail features include streetscape improvements along the entire waterfront trail, a bi-directional bikeway, pedestrian walkway and rain gardens that will collect the first inch of storm water, relieving the city sewer system during major weather events, as well as benches and bike racks, decorative street pavers, and innovative solar trail lighting Read More
The Christina Riverfront is one of many reasons for exploring the Delaware culture trail; cruise in a water taxis or stroll the landscaped Riverwalk. Wilmington was the "last stop to freedom" on the Underground Railroad; the Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park is named for Underground Railroad Conductor Harriett Tubman and Stationmaster Thomas Garrett.
Brandywine Creek is a tributary of the Christina River in southeastern Pennsylvania and northern Delaware. The 20.4 mile Lower Brandywine is a designated Pennsylvania Scenic River with several tributary streams.
Development & Conservancy Issues In the 1960s, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania in historic Brandywine Valley, faced a possible massive industrial development that would impact a largely rural community. Read More
Chester County William Penn established Chester County in 1682 as one of the first three counties in Pennsylvania; West Chester is the county seat. Other historic towns in Chester County include Kennett Square, Oxford and Phoenixville. Each has its own unique agricultural, revolutionary and industrial histories. These "Main Streets of the Brandywine Valley" are treasures of a time gone by with lovely tree-lined streets filled with restaurants, shops, galleries, markets and festivals. Read More
Delaware County The Chadds Ford Historic District includes 17 buildings in Chadds Ford village. Notable buildings include the Chads Ford Inn (1807-1810), Merchant Mill (1864), a row of houses built between 1840 and 1850, the bridge across Brandywine Creek, and the Christian C. Sanderson Museum. Located in the district are the separately listed Chad House and N. C. Wyeth House and Studio. Read More
Planning Your Trip assumes uniquely local dimensions wherever you go; the activities that you, the visitor – local, or global –  select and irrespective of the length of your stay, are unique of the community you are visiting and rooted into the local economy, history and traditions. TEMA develops personalized travel itineraries based on client interests by leveraging an in-depth knowledge of your destination, superior client service in the planning stages and throughout the trip or event as well as logistics expertise to reduce your travel costs and transfer times. tema@arezza.net | skype arezza1

New York

The Hudson Valley extends 150 miles above the tip of Manhattan. Designated as a National Heritage Area, the valley is steeped in history, natural beauty, culture, food and farmers’ markets. The first Dutch settlement was established at Fort Nassau, a trading post south of modern day Albany, in the early 17th century, with the purpose of exchanging European goods for beaver pelts. During the French and Indian War in the 1750s, the northern end of the valley became the bulwark of the British defense against French invasion from Canada via Lake Champlain. The valley also became one of the major regions of conflict during the American Revolution. Read More

Dutchess County is 800 square miles of natural scenic beauty, historic and cultural landmarks, and outdoor recreation. Stroll the Walkway Over the Hudson. Tour and taste along the Dutchess Wine Trail. Explore the homes of FDR and Vanderbilt. Taste new creations at The Culinary Institute of America. Fill the pantry at farm markets. Cruise the Hudson River. Video
Rockland County is located just 30 miles north of New York City and is known for its quaint villages, spectacular river views and outdoor recreation with 32,000 acres of parklands dotted with sparkling lakes and streams rushing down to the Hudson. Miles marked trails lead right to the foothills of the Ramapo Mountains. Read More
TEMA’s Professional Enrichment Tours focus suburban sprawl, declining water quality, diminishing water supplies, vanishing agricultural land, loss of historic character, wildlife habitat degradation, and threatened biological resources. Learn to:
Protect and conserve land and water, natural, cultural and scenic resources;
Improve site planning and design to support resource conservation;
Enhance awareness and knowledge of conservation approaches.
If you are in local government, are a developer, landowner or in business and are interested in expanding your skills in these areas, please contact us for a no obligation travel and/or training plan.
Connect with Tema
receive a detailed travel plan
for Your Delaware Hudson and Susquehanna River Valley Travel Experience
Local Knowledge – Global Reach
tema@arezza.net |skype arezza1 

 

Monday, January 18, 2016

Texas Trails Travel Experience



austin san antonio the texas hill country fort worth grapevine and dallas
City and Hill Country
Austin, on the eastern edge of Texas Hill Country, is the state capital, the live music capital of the world, a center for film, home to the University of Texas and Formula 1's Circuit of the Americas raceway. The city’ parks and lakes are popular for hiking, biking, swimming, boating and other outdoor pursuits as well as a ballet, world-class museums and a unique shopping experience. Read More


Texas History and Traditions
Experience San Antonio’s rich heritage by visiting its 18th century Spanish colonial missions, residential areas dating from the 1860s and the local museums that celebrate the city’s past.
San Antonio Missions National Historic Park the Mission Trail is a walking, biking or driving experience of the five local missions and the centuries of local history and culture: Mission San Antonio de Valero, commonly known as the Alamo, Mission Concepción, Mission San José, Mission San Juan Capistrano and Mission San Francisco de la Espada. The San Antonio Mission Trail begins at the Alamo and winds southward along a nine-mile stretch of the San Antonio River. Read More
Culture Entrepreneurship Environment
Dallas is relatively young city with a colorful past. In 1839, John Neely Bryan, a lawyer from Tennessee with a taste for adventure, wandered into the area and was impressed with what he believed to be the perfect ingredients for a trading post and eventually a town: plenty of raw land, Indians with whom to do business, and the river. The young city’s can-do spirit helped bring the railroads to the area in the 1870s, the Federal Reserve Bank in 1914, Southern Methodist University in 1915, Love Field Airport in 1927, the Texas Centennial Exposition in 1936 and DFW International Airport in 1973.
Turmoil and Success the 1960s were a time of turmoil for many American cities and the lowest point in Dallas history when on Nov. 22, 1963 President John F. Kennedy was assassinated on a downtown street. The event cast the city. The people of Dallas took it hard and entered a period of self-evaluation and introspection which lead to a series of entrepreneurial success stories culminating in DFW International Airport, realizing John Neely Bryan's dream of a major inland port. Since the 1980s Dallas has become home to many major corporate headquarters and a dominant force in the convention, meetings and tourism industry.
Read More
Planning Your Trip assumes uniquely local dimensions wherever you go; the activities that you, the visitor – local, or global –  select and irrespective of the length of your stay, are unique of the community you are visiting and rooted into the local economy, history and traditions. TEMA develops personalized travel itineraries based on client interests by leveraging an in-depth knowledge of your destination, superior client service in the planning stages and throughout the trip or event as well as logistics expertise to reduce your travel costs and transfer times. tema@arezza.net | skype arezza1
Wineries Public Art Trails and Vintage Railroads
Grapevine is a small town located between Dallas and Fort Worth and is home of DFW International Airport, the world’s fourth largest, with nonstop service from more than 200 cities, including over 50 international destinations. Main Street in the historic downtown has a public library, recreation center, antique stores, restaurants, bars, theaters, a park, and many specialty shops. Here, you can also bottle your own wine, explore Historic Nash Farm, the Botanical Gardens and Lake Grapevine.
A Downtown Walking Tour the Main Street Historic District includes over 50 buildings and their architectural descriptions as well as stories, events and people who contributed to the town’s development. Founded in 1844, Grapevine is the oldest community in Tarrant County. In 1888, when the Cotton Belt Railroad came to Grapevine, businesses flourished and the wooden buildings on Main Street were replaced with new structures constructed of locally-made brick. Read More
Cowboys and Cowgirls   
Fort Worth was settled in 1849 as an army outpost along the Trinity River as one of eight forts assigned to protect settlers on the advancing frontier. The cattle industry was king for a generation of people working the Fort Worth leg of the historic Chisholm Trail, which ran from the 1860s to the 1870s when the Texas & Pacific Railway arrived. In the years that followed, oil and aviation brought new wealth throughout the region. The post-war years found Fort Worth capitalizing on its strengths as a transport, business and military center. Cultural pursuits included the development of the city's internationally acclaimed museum district. The mid-1980s saw the start of a major revitalization of that city's downtown and the introduction of Sundance Square, a 35-block commercial, residential, entertainment and retail district. Fort Worth's red brick buildings endure and its Western heritage lives on as visitors can experience the Old West beautifully preserved through the Stockyards National Historic District.
Food Brews and Spirits in Fort Worth you can experience cowboy cuisine, trendy farm-to-table, authentic Mexican and bayou fare. Highlights include beef briskets, pork ribs and locally grown, organic artisan cheeses, alongside nicely paired wines. Artisanal distilleries offer straight bourbon, premium blended whiskey and vodka made from black-eyed peas. Also handcrafted beers, some brewed with milk, honey and sugar, accompanied by live music and local food trucks. Read More



Connect with Tema
receive a detailed travel plan
for Your Texas Trails Travel Experience
Local Knowledge – Global Reach
tema@arezza.net |skype arezza1